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in 2005 and brings more than 20 years of leadership experience in the health-care industry. finally, that brings us to our keynote speaker tonight. most of us for member that moment sandra fluke entered the national spotlight. as a loss to net georgetown university, she testified before a house democratic committee on the importance of requiring insurance plans to cover contraception. her remarks drew the attention of radio talk-show host rush limbaugh, who called her names i will not dignify by repeating. but maybe what is not well known is that she had long ago devoted her career to public interest advocacy. before attending georgetown, she created and lead a new exit program that helped bring quality services to victims of domestic violence and even trafficking. she also co-founded a new york statewide coalition that successfully lobbied for legislation allowing gay teenagers and other victims of partner violence to civil orders of protection. she recently graduated from georgetown's school of law and now spencer time speaking out on issues concerning women and health-care access
a better health-care networks for the poor. i believe if the government blocked -- done away with the strings and the manas, i could have overseen the delivery of health care to the poor. -- do away with the mandates. health care for those over 65. get the federal government out of health care completely. get is how we're going to out of this. giving it up to the states. 50 laboratories of innovation. i think that is exactly what we will have. we will have some fabulous success. we will also have some horrible failures. that's how we will find ourselves out of this. host: gary johnson is joining us from new mexico this morning. we will put the phone numbers on the bottom of the screen. you can see the phone lines on the bottom of the screen. as we take a look at the libertarian nominee. there was a recent gallup poll. americans are sort of split on the need for a third party. is your argument for a third party -- what is your argument for a third party? guest: i would argue i'm not the third choice but the only choice. i will be on the ballot in all 50 states. we're on the ba
for us to do with medicare in particular is to lower health-care costs. but when it comes to social security, as i said, you don't need a major structural change in order to make sure that social security is there for the future. >> will follow up on this. first, governor romney, you have two minutes on social security and entitlements. >> well, jim, our seniors depend on these programs, and i know anytime we talk about entitlements, people become concerned that something's got to happen that's going to change their life for the worse. the answer is neither the president nor i are proposing any changes for current retirees or near retirees, either to social security or medi-scare. so if you're 60 or run 60 or older, you don't need to listen any further. but for younger people, we need to talk about what changes are going to be occurring. all, i just thought about one bit that is, in fact, i was wrong when i said the president isn't proposing any changes for current retirees. in fact, he is on medicare put on social security he's not. but on medicare, for current retirees, he's cutti
in the united states senate to create good jobs, good healthcare, a quality education and a retirement we all deserve. >> when all is said and done, your campaign seemed to have slid into a familiar floyd which is you're portraying your opponents in ways we have heard time and time again. you're portrayed as a friend of the rich as somebody who will make middle class pay more because the rich shouldn't have any sort of implications of their taxes changes. >> you are portrayed as a techs and spend liberal. tell me specifically what one thing about your opponent makes him less qualified than you to serve in the u.s. senate. >> you go first. >> well he mentions the middle class, he mentioned it tonight. he does it fairly often. but the middle class is not doing very well at all. we've got to do better. and so i read the pless -- press releases that you put out and i've heard your opening statement, but i don't hear any action items about how we're going to do it better. and so i've got a plan. i know that if we do what we've been doing, more of the same, well, we'll have the same outcome and tha
for a presidential candidates. the big achievement was the health-care bill, which seemed like a good idea at the time to him. i do not think it is a very comparable situation. in a funny way, i would say we know less. it is harder to anticipate what the white house administration will look like then it may be normally would be the case with bob dole or john mccain or bill clinton, people that have been an office for a long time, either as senator or governorships. one had a sense of the strengths and weaknesses. the other question is the campaign, what have we learned from the campaigns? i will think about that for a minute. that is an interesting question. there is no obvious thing that leaps out. look at the way but romney has run the campaign, therefore he will be this kind of president. t. iran is min it is not the path to really make serious arguments and really educate the public. mitt romney has said this himself. it is of anything for a can of it. it is a funny thing for a candidate to say that that is what he thinks of campaigning. you could be a very serious president as george
, the individual mandate. if the health-care law is repealed, would you favor keeping pre-existing conditions coverage, and if so, how would you pay for it? >> i support repealing the health care act. i think that is important. what i hear from people across the state is that they overwhelmingly support it as well. we don't like the individual mandate, we don't like government coming between a doctor and patient. pre-existing conditions -- you know, i am visiting with nebraskans and at that is important that we address that and i believe the united states senate will come together to address it. what i will tell you is that we won't pay for it by stealing over $700 billion from medicare, because that was the trade-off on health care act now. that was the deal that was made. that is not sound policy. everybody knows it is not sound policy. what we can do is look for savings. we can look for savings with tort reform, because over 1/4 of the medical procedures that are required now are unnecessary. that is one way we can look for the money. >> letter kerrey? -- senator kerrey? >> first of all, i
it harder for you to vote, the folks in washington who think they should control that health-care choices that women should be making for themselves. only you can make change happen. only you have the power to move us forward. from the day we began this campaign, i always said real change takes time, it takes more than one term. you cannot do it if it have a president who writes off half the nation before he even takes office. you know, in 2008 47% of the country did not vote for me. on the night of the election i said all those americans, i may not have won your votes, i have heard your voices, i need your help, and i will be your president, too. that is all i want to say to denver. what i want to say to the great state of colorado, i do not know how many of you will be with me this time around, but i will plead with you no matter what, because i'm not fighting to create democratic or republican, jobs, i am fighting to create american jobs. i am not fighting to improve schools in red states or blue states, i am fighting to improve schools in the united states. and if we rally around a ne
problems, energy problems, environmental problems. our health-care system, our tax system. our regulatory policies. washington has taken another five-week vacation. it took a five-week vacation in august, worked two weeks, taking another five-week vacation. if these people did a better job, they would not have to take some much time off to campaign, raising money, because if they did a good job, people will reward you. when you do not do a good job, you have to spend a lot more time doing that. >> do you think we would be better off with a parliamentary system, where one party to control things for a time, and we did not have to deal with a republican house, a senate of democrats, so we are always at this gridlock? we kind of let the supreme court make the decision because the politicians cannot do it. >> we need to work at bath, but i have no idea how, because as you know, that is the way it is. it is human nature to maintain the status quo until the things get terrible. then people get flexible. that is the worst time to solve the problem. the best time to solve a problem is when your t
with to give health-care benefits appeared only part-time do not have health care benefits. that happens to be the same as your firm. a strike as you criticize me for. you know they were strikers of a company we were not investigated in -- invested in. you parade that are around as if it is my problem. i am a fan of the minimum wage. when will this end? [applause] >> i would have thought mr. romney would avast me what i was going to do for working families in massachusetts, how we would get our economy on the road, expressing differences, talking about the real measures that were going to affect children. i will provide all the documents and you asked for. i hope you tell me where you provide health insurance for your companies overseas. finally, let me say this. it was set well yesterday. he is a distinguished former senator of united states. let's talk about health care, education, training, new jobs, infrastructure, our different visions for massachusetts. that is what the people of massachusetts want to talk about. that is what i think they want to hear about. >> i want to know why y
worked with thim them every week and aument all the time and managed to get his healthcare plan passed with only two descending votes. so i think you saw some of that from him. in terms of the brooder picture is americans -- and this is not a knock, they generally want what they don't have. when one party is in control you tend to have elections like 2006 or 2010 where the party that controls everything gets slapped down. and then when you have what you have now where you have split control where the democrats have 2/3 and the republicans have 1/3 of washington, then people say i think we'll be better with one party control and then they say be careful what you wish for. >> i just have two comments. last night my reaction to the debate was where is the substance mr. romney? is that a good debate just throwing around a lot of comments. and i didn't think the spt taking credit for some of the things he's doing. and the second comment i is minority voters are scared of the i.d. i would like to see if you would comment on how you're polling and if you're involved with any of the hispanic l
that same template to medicare, health care for those over 65, get the federal government out of the health-care business completely , give it up to the states, in this case, block grants that balance revenues and expenditures, and that is how we ever get out of this. giving it up to the states, 50 laboratories of innovation and best practices, that is exactly what we will have. we will have some fabulous success and some horrible failure. failure of lincoln avoided, success will be emulated. that is how we will find our way out of this. host: gary johnson is with us from new mexico. he will be with us for about 40 more minutes. we will put the phone numbers on the bottom of the screen as we take a look at the libertarian nominee and his race overall. there is a recent gallup poll that shows americans are split on the need for a third party. pretty much split. what is your argument for a third party? guest: in this case, i will argue that i am not the third choice but the only choice. in this case, i am on the ballot -- will be on the ballot in all 50 states. right now we're on the ballot in 47
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11